Cats Protection reunites owners with three cats missing for a total of 21 years

21 June 2017
Cats Protection reunites owners with three cats missing for a total of 21 years Cats Protection has renewed calls for compulsory microchipping of cats after helping three cats who had been missing for a total of 21 years finally find their way back to their owners.
 
Ringo, Whiskey and George were all handed into separate branches and centres of the charity in June – appropriately during National Microchipping Month – and were swiftly reunited with their owners thanks to details on their microchips.
 
While Ringo and George had both been missing from their homes for five years, Whiskey had been gone for a staggering 11 years when he was handed into Cats Protection’s care.
 
Cats Protection spokeswoman Cat Jarvis said: “Cats Protection frequently reunites cats with their owners, and the main reason why this is possible is because the cats have been microchipped.
 
“Whiskey, Ringo and George’s owners were all thrilled to have their much-loved pets home after being missing for so long, and this was only possible because they had been ‘chipped."
 
The stories behind the happy reunions are: 
 
Whiskey:  Whiskey was reunited with his owner Marie Goddard an incredible 11 years after he went missing from his home in Wanstead, East London. It is thought the ginger puss became lost and was later taken in by an elderly man living nearby, who assumed he was a stray. The man later moved to Caister-on-Sea in Norfolk, taking Whiskey with him and caring for him until ill health meant he needed to hand him into Cats Protection’s Anglia Coastal Branch. A routine scan for a microchip revealed his original owner, and Whiskey was later reunited with Marie after 11 years. She said: “I was absolutely overwhelmed and thrilled to see Whiskey again. I always thought he must have died, perhaps in a road accident, so to see him again was just wonderful. I had always felt so sad that I never had any idea what had happened to him, but thanks to his micrcochip he is now back in our lives.”
 
Ringo: Ringo had been gone for five years when a farmer contacted Cats Protection's Exeter Axhayes Adoption Centre to report him as a stray. After bringing him into the centre, staff used the details on his microchip to trace his owner Carolyn Daniels, who lives just a few miles away in Bradninch, Devon. She said: "He was thin, looking a bit worse for wear and in need of a bit of TLC, but we were overjoyed to see Ringo again. As soon as we got him home he was purring away, he definitely recognised us and our other cat, Arthur. Our teenage daughters were so thrilled to see Ringo again and it really is so wonderful to have him home. I never gave up hope, I knew that if he was ever scanned for a microchip I would get a call, but as the years passed it seemed less and less likely we would ever see him again. And then it happened! If he hadn’t been microchipped we would never have got him back."
 
George: George had been missing from his home in Eastbourne, Sussex, for five years when he was handed into Cats Protection’s National Cat Adoption Centre in Sussex. Having gone missing from owner Carrie-Ann Bishop’s home, it is believed he was taken in by an elderly woman who assumed he was a stray. Eventually, she became too frail to care for him and handed him into Cats Protection, where staff carried out a routine microchip scan and discovered his original owner’s details. Carrie-Ann said: “I am so pleased that me and my two children have been reunited with our cat after five years, thanks to him being microchipped. I cannot thank Cats Protection enough for all their effort in reuniting us and I would urge everybody to get their pets microchipped.”
 
While the charity is able to bring about many happy reunions, figures released earlier this month by Cats Protection show that two in three stray cats are never reunited with their owners.
 
The charity's calls for compulsory microchipping of cats appeared in Cats Protection’s 2022 Agenda for Cats, which urges politicians from all parties to support measures to protect cats from abandonment, harm and neglect.
 
Cat added: “We know from our research that less than a third of pet cats are microchipped and one in four have no identification at all. If all cats were microchipped the chances of reuniting missing cats with their owners would be greatly increased, leading to many more happy reunions.
 
“Legislation relating to the compulsory microchipping of dogs came into force last year so we are asking the Government to now turn its attention to cats.”
 
As part of its campaign, Cats Protection is urging cat owners to ‘chip their pets and keep their records up to date so they are able to reunite more missing moggies with their owners.
 
The charity’s latest video promoting the benefits of microchipping is available to view here 

~ Ends ~

For more information please contact Michaela Phillips by emailing michaela@adastramedia.co.uk or call 07740 305918. 

Notes to Editors: 
  1. Cats Protection commissioned Atomik Research to survey 2,000 cat owners across the UK in May 2016.
  2. Cats Protection is the UK’s leading feline welfare charity and helps around 190,000 cats each year through its national network of over 250 volunteer-run branches and 34 centres.
  3. Cats Protection’s vision is a world where every cat is treated with kindness and an understanding of its needs.
  4. Cats Protection’s registered charity number is 203644 (England and Wales) and SC037711 (Scotland). Founded as the Cats Protection League in 1927, the charity adopted the name Cats Protection in 1998. We ask that you use the name Cats Protection when referring to the charity in all published material.
  5. More information about the work of Cats Protection can be found at www.cats.org